Queering Now

Film + Performance Night

Queering Now is a film and performance night that amplifies marginalized voices of Chinese Queer, situated in a multiplicity of social contexts. Curated by Whiskey Chow and Sha Li, the programme explores 'Chinese' from a broader prospective rather than referring it to a specific nationality.

 

The curatorial aim is to investigate the notion of 'Chinese' and 'Chinese Queer' by bringing multi-layered identities and artists from diverse backgrounds to reflect alternative approaches to the cultural heritage of queer diaspora. 

Comprised in three parts, the film programme features artist Wang Haiyang’s signature sensory and surreal stop-motion animations, filmmaker and queer activist Fan Popo’s short film “Beer! Beer!”, artist and film director Andrew Thomas Huang’s lush and captivating short film about an ordinary restaurant worker’s extraordinary sexual awakening, followed by young artist April Lin and Jasmine Lin’s work, a refreshing queer love story:  ‘Reality Fragment 160921’  where they merge in both physical and digital worlds.

The live performances include artist and Chinese drag king Whiskey Chow’s new iteration of ‘The Moon is Warmer Than the Sun’, which sits between the mythological paradox of power and contemporary queer longing and idolatry, then  ‘Steamed Three Eggs’, a reading weaving speculative fiction with personal histories by artist Victoria Sin, and multi-disciplinary artist LI YILEI’s experimental sound work ‘Your Figures are Muted’.

The after party is launched by model, musician, witch, and artist Ayesha Tan Jones, who presents the first act of ‘Parasites of Pangu’, a dystopian opera that explores the world through the story of an archeologist of the future, based on a Chinese creation myth.

Queering Now is kindly supported by the Arts Council England and Live Art UK. 

Featured artists:

Victoria Sin

Andrew Thomas Huang

Wang Haiyang

Ayesha Tan Jones

LI YILEI

CHOOC LY

Fan Popo

April Lin and Jasmine Lin

Whiskey Chow

Exhibition Review: Queer Chinese Art and Performance in a Time of Viral Contagion